Examples of naturally-occurring chemicals

Read the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

The following are examples of chemicals considered to meet (or not meet) the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical.

Examples - naturally-occurring or not naturally-occurring?More information
 Essential oil with lavenderEssential oils

Essential oils are aroma compounds extracted from plant materials that are commonly used in cosmetics.

If you use steam distillation of plant materials to produce essential oils, including distillation of the stems, leaves, roots, flowers or fruit etc, then they are not considered naturally-occurring.

You must register your business with us before you can import or manufacture this chemical. You must also check to see if this chemical is on the Inventory.

pouring cement

Chemicals used in construction

Chemicals that meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

The following chemicals are naturally-occurring if they are obtained from the earth without chemical or heat processing:

  • non-bleached clays
  • silica
  • mined gypsum

You don’t need to register with us if you only import or manufacture these chemicals.

Chemicals that do NOT meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

The following chemicals and products contain chemicals that do not occur naturally or do not meet the definition. If you manufacture or import these chemicals or products you must register with us and check that all ingredients are on the Inventory:

  • lime
  • soda
  • cement
  • mortar
  • grout
  • epoxies

Finished products such as fibre board, glass, pressed wood, cement board are articles and you don’t need to register with us if you are importing these products.

Mineral ores

Chemicals that meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

The following mineral ores are naturally-occurring if they are obtained from the earth without chemical or heat processing:

  • hematite
  • magnetite
  • bauxite
  • chalcopyrite

Chemicals that do NOT meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

Extractive and secondary manufacturing methods such as refining, roasting, smelting, steelmaking, leaching result in chemicals that are no longer naturally-occurring.

 Argan oil

Chemical that meets the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

Argan oil obtained after cold-pressing the fruit/seeds from Argania spinose.

Chemical that does NOT meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

Argan oil that is deodorised (i.e. the selective removal of volatile compounds from the oil using steam) following cold-pressing is no longer a naturally-occurring chemical.

Argan oil which is manufactured via solvent extraction.

 Beeswax

Chemical that meets the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

Beeswax that is heated to remove water.

Chemical that does NOT meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical

Beeswax that is treated at any stage with bleaching earth and/or activated carbon (i.e. to change the colour of the wax) is no longer naturally-occurring.

 Plant extracts

Extracts from the leaves, roots or flowers of a plant can have industrial uses such as ingredients in cosmetics or cleaning products.

If you freeze-dry a plant (or part of a plant), grind the material and then use water to obtain the extracts, those extracts meet the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical.

However, if the ground plant was extracted with a solvent other than water (for example methanol), it no longer meets the definition of a naturally-occurring chemical.

Last update 31 August 2018