Priority Existing Chemical assessments

A priority existing chemical (PEC) is an industrial chemical that has been identified as requiring an assessment because there are reasonable grounds for believing that manufacturing, handling, storing, using or disposing of the chemical could be a risk to health and/or the environment.

Following a chemical assessment by NICNAS, there could be changes in circumstances that would later require particular aspects of a chemical to be re-assessed. This process is called secondary notification and assessment.

Read more about priority existing chemicals

Most PEC assessments are accompanied by an easy-to-understand fact sheet which summarises key recommendations for a non-scientific audience.

Chemical Gazette May 2019 notice - call for information on PentaBDE

We are currently assessing the human health and environmental risks of pentabromodiphenyl ether (pentaBDE) as a Priority Existing Chemical under sections 57 and 60A of the Industrial Chemicals (Notification and Assessment) Act 1989 (the ICNA Act). Under section 58 of the ICNA Act, the Director of NICNAS is seeking to obtain the most up to date information on pentaBDE for the purpose of assessing the chemical.  PentaBDE (CAS number: 1163-19-5) was declared a priority existing chemical (PEC) in January 2006, and this declaration remains in force.

See full details of this notice in the May 2019 Chemical Gazette

List of PECS

The assessments are in alphabetical order by chemical or trade name. Click on a letter in the list or use the page links. A name that begins with a number can be found in 1,2,3...

Chemical/trade name: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 1,2,3...

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Click on the chemical/trade name to download the scientific assessment.


Tetrachloroethylene - PEC15 [WORD 250 KB]

CAS number(s): 127-18-4

Published 1 June 2001

Tetrachloroethylene was declared a priority existing chemical for preliminary assessment on 7 April 1998 (PEC/15). Tetrachloroethylene manufacture in Australia ceased in 1991. From 1995 to 1999 imports decreased from about 4200 tonnes to 2500 tonnes per year. The chemical is primarily imported and used in its ‘pure’ form, in industrial processes, with approximately 80% of the import volume used in the dry cleaning industry.

For a summary of the assessment read the Tetrachloroethylene fact sheet.


Trichloroethylene - PEC8 [WORD 5.3 MB]

CAS number(s): 79-01-6

Published 1 March 2000

Trichloroethylene was declared a priority existing chemical for full assessment on 4 April 1995 (PEC/8). The declaration was due to the wide use of the chemical as an industrial solvent with occupational and public exposure, the wide range of products containing the chemical, and differences of opinion regarding the carcinogenic status of the chemical.

For a summary of the assessment read the Trichloroethylene fact sheet.


Triclosan - PEC30 [WORD 8.2 MB]

CAS number(s): 3380-34-5

Published 1 January 2009

Phenol, 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy), commonly known as Triclosan, was declared a priority existing chemical for full assessment on 6 May 2003 (PEC/30). The widespread use of triclosan provides a number of pathways for the chemical to enter the environment, and laboratory tests have shown it to be toxic to aquatic species, with algae being the most sensitive species. Due to its antimicrobial properties Triclosan is used in personal care and cosmetic products, therapeutic products and cleaning agents.

For a summary of the assessment read the Triclosan fact sheet.


Triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC) - PEC1 [WORD 1.3 MB]

CAS number(s): 2451-62-9

Published 1 April 1994

Triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC) was declared a priority existing chemical for full assessment on 5 November 1991 (PEC/1). The declaration was made due to animal toxicity studies which indicated a potential for TGIC to cause genetic damage. The studies raised concerns that TGIC could be a human carcinogen and mutagen and could have adverse reproductive effects. TGIC is used as a curing agent for weather-resistant powder coatings for furniture, car parts, metal fencing, window and door frames, shelving, electrical equipment and domestic appliances.

For a summary of the assessment read the TGIC fact sheet.


Triglycidylisocyanurate (TGIC)—secondary notification - PEC1s [WORD 757 KB]

CAS number(s): 2451-62-9

Published 1 February 2001

In 1998 one company notified NICNAS of new information relating to the respiratory sensitising potential of TGIC. As a result TGIC was reassessed (PEC 1s) to review the new data. TGIC is used as a curing agent for weather-resistant powder coatings for furniture, car parts, metal fencing, window and door frames, shelving, electrical equipment and domestic appliances.


Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TBPP) - PEC27 [WORD 237 KB]

CAS number(s): 126-72-7

Published 1 November 2005

Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TBPP) was declared a priority existing chemical for a full risk assessment on 6 July 2004 (PEC/27). The declaration of TBPP was due to the listing of the chemical in Annex III of the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade. In the past, TBPP was used as a flame retardant for children’s sleepwear. TBPP has since been banned for use in children’s clothing in the US, as a fire retardant in textile products in Japan, and in textile articles such as garments and linen in the European Commission (EC).


Trisphosphates - PEC17 [WORD 267 KB]

CAS number(s): 13674-84-5; 13674-87-8; 6145-73-9; 78-43-3; 1067-98-7

Published 1 June 2001

Trisphosphates were declared priority existing chemicals for preliminary assessment on 7 March 2000 (PEC17). The declaration was due to concerns for potential bioaccumulation of these chemicals. The focus of this report is on the chlorinated members of this class of chemicals and their use and exposure in Australia.

For a summary of the assessment read the Trisphosphates fact sheet.

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Last update 7 May 2019